Chamber Chat - Disconnect & take a digital detox - Paddy Hunt

September 19, 2019 - 12:00pm

Chamber Chat - Disconnect & take a digital detox - Paddy Hunt

In your everyday working life, it is likely that you frequently use digital devices to help run your business. Whether it’s trading online, carrying out your work on a computer, completing admin tasks or managing marketing and social media campaigns, you may find yourself staring at a screen for the majority of the day.  

Even when you’ve finished work for the day, there seems to be no let up. We live in a connected world which means our social lives are shared with friends and family online, so you feel compelled to open the social apps, stay in touch and catch up on what you’ve missed. And the next thing you know, you’ve spent hours browsing social posts, looking at funny videos and playing mobile games.

Yet somehow, this constant need to remain connected has led to increased levels of stress, depression and isolation. Looking at electronic screens for longer than an hour has been found to have a negative effect on sleep, mood and concentration. In 2017, Deloitte* found that 79% of 16-24 year olds checked their phone in the hour before they went to sleep, and 55% checked their phone within 15 minutes of waking up.

Sound familiar? It’s time to put down that device and give yourself a well-deserved break: a digital detox! But, don’t worry, we’re not advocating you lock away your devices, just simply restrict the amount of time you spend on them. A digital detox can last as little as a few hours a day, or you could go to the extreme like Simon Cowell who stopped using his phone for 10 months.

Whatever you decide to do, a digital detox is said to reduce stress and improve sleep, concentration and happiness, a must when you’ve had a hard day at work. And as an employer, it’s your responsibility to look after your own and your employees’ physical and mental wellbeing.     

*Deloitte’s 2017 Mobile Consumer Survey “State of the smart” [Link: https://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/press-releases/articles/uk-public-glued-to-smartphones.html]